Dussehra Festival 2021 Date Timings, Legend Story, Rituals & Images

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Dussehra 2021: Vijayadashami usually called Dussehra. One of India’s widely celebrated festivals which is observed at the end of Navratri. According to the Hindu calendar this day falls in the month of Ashwin, which are the months of September and October as per the English calendar.

Across the nation, Dussehra is observed for diverse reasons and is even celebrated in numerous manners.

Dussehra 2021 Date Timings

Happy Dusshera 2021
Happy Dusshera 2021

The Vijay muhurat will start at 2:02 pm and end at 2:48 pm. This will last for a duration of 46 minutes.

Bengal Vijayadashami will be held on Friday, 15th of October 2021.

Aparahna puja time will start at 1:16 pm and end at 03:34 pm and will last for a duration of 2 hours and 18 minutes.

The Dashami tithi will start at 6:52 pm on October 14, 2021, and end at 6:02 pm on 15th of October 2021.

Shravana Nakshatra will begin at 9:36 am on October 14, 2021, and end at 9:16 am on 15th of October 2021.

On the day of Vijayadashami, rituals like Shami Puja, Aparajita puja, and Seema Avalanghan are to be followed. As per the Hindu division of the day, these rituals are to be executed during Aparahna time.

What is Dusshera Festival?

Dussehra is marked by the end of Durga Pujo in the eastern and northeastern Indian states. This is in commemorative of goddess Durga’s victory over the demon. Again, in the northern, southern and western parts of India, the festival signifies Rama killing Ravana and hance releasing his wife Sita, who was in his prison. Besides, in these parts of India the festival marks the end of “Ramlila” which is the dramatic folk act created on the life of Lord Rama. Dussehra is all about the tale of Rama’s victory over Ravana, or otherwise it also marks a respect and regard for one of the aspects of Durga.

Happy Dusshera 2021
Happy Dusshera 2021

People take out processions carrying the idols of Durga, Laksmi, Ganesh, Kartikeya and saraswati, which are later immersed in the river in the eastern Indian states and in other regions of India fireworks and burning of large effigies of Ravana marks the celebrations of Dussehra.

This festival also starts the preparation India’s most extensively celebrated festival Diwali, which is celebrated right after twenty days of Dussehra.

Ayudha Puja 2021

Ayudha Puja is celebrated in several parts of India on the ninth day of Dussehra. Celebrations may involve many common mundane tools that used in everyday life, like computers, books, cars, or kitchen tools. The purpose is to see divine in everything, remarkably those things used in one’s livelihood.

Navratri 2021

This festival in the southern India states is known as Navaratri and it circles around the worship of the goddesses Lakshmi and Saraswati. Goddess Lakshmi is allied with good luck and wealth, where as Sarasvati is related with wisdom and fertility.

The festival is a time of the year for visiting friends and relatives, and decorating the houses with colourful displays of toys and images of gods. There are nine days of music and dancing in Gujarat.

Legend Behind Dusshera Festival

The religious Hindu classic Ramayana reveals the legendary story of Lord Rama winning his beloved wife Sita, who was kidnapped by the demon Ravana who was the emperor of Lanka..

Happy Dusshera Wishes 2021
Happy Dusshera Wishes 2021

As per Hindu mythology, the sister of Ravana, Shoorpnakha, fell in love with Rama and Lakshman and wanted to marry any one of them. After being rejected by both of them, she threatened them to kill Sita. This lead to Ravana kidnapping Sita to take revenge of her sister. In order to rescue Sita, Rama and Lakshmana fought a battle with Ravana.

How Dusshera Festival is Celebrated?

Plays and dance performances known as ‘Ramalila’, portraying the life of Lord Rama, usually take place in the lead up to Dussehra day in northern India. These shows are especially huge in Varanasi and Delhi. On Dussehra, huge effigies of the Ravan are burned all across the nation.

Happy Dusshera Wishes Images 2021
Happy Dusshera Wishes Images 2021

The biggest Ravan effigy in India and also in the world can be found in Dhanas village, Chandigarh. This effigy was about 221 feet tall in 2019. Lack of space forced the effigy to be transferred to EWS Colony’s Gadda Ground. The fabric of Ravan’s clothes was progressed to higher quality silk and even his facial features got a makeover. Significantly, the crackers used during this time are also eco-friendly. It finally took 40 workers and six months to craft the effigy.

In Mysore, the cultural performances and fairs are the actual the highlight of the 10-day Mysore Dasara festival. It is grand procession of decked elephants and guards riding on horseback to aide the goddess all through the city. This is a tradition which is related to the city’s royal family.

Dussehra festivities in the Kullu Valley are centred around the head deity of the valley which is an an idol of Lord Ram called ‘Raghunath’, that was brought there from Ayodhya, Uttar Pradesh. This festival was documented by the Guinness Book of World Records in the year 2015 for the largest performance of the Nati folk dance, with more than almost 9,000 contestants.

Rituals Performed During the Dusshera Puja

Dussehra is well thought out to be a propitious time to worship apparatuses that are used to earn money. At the present time, this includes laptops and cars. As per the legend in the classic Mahabharata, Arjun hid his weapons in a tree and when he came back a year later that was on the day of Dussehra, he securely repossessed them. Then he worshiped the weapons and also the tree.

Happy Dusshera Wishes 2021
Happy Dusshera Wishes 2021

Ravan is portrayed as having 10 heads and 20 limbs. He is frequently thought of as signifying the negative or evil emotions that are present in humans being. Each of Ravan’s 10 heads relates to an aspect that must be conquered: lust or the ‘kama vasana’, anger or the ‘krodha’, delusion or the ‘moha’, greed or the ‘lobha’, pride or ‘mada’, jealousy or ‘matsara’, selfishness or ‘swartha’, hatred or ‘durmati’, cruelty or ‘amanavta’, and ego or ‘ahankara’.

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